Books Medical ethics Neonatology Science & faith

Matters of Life and Death

51OGGYC+yYLMatters of Life and Death is my first book and it explores a range of ethical dilemmas from the beginning and end of life: abortion, genetics, foetal screening, reproductive technology, physician-assisted suicide and many more.

Writing out of a deep conviction that the Bible’s view of our humanness points a way forward, I try to suggest how healthcare professionals, churches and individuals can respond to some of the most difficult challenges in medicine.

It was originally derived from the 1996 London Lectures on Contemporary Christianity and first published in 1998. In 2009 it was extensively revised and updated.

You can buy it here.

 

John Wyatt ducks no questions and offers no glib solutions to complex contemporary problems. He takes readers into his confidence, shares his expertise with them, and expected them to make up their own minds. His well-grounded Christian faith informs all his thinking and his personal integrity shines through this book from beginning to end. — Rev John Stott

A clear, authoritative and highly intelligent account of some of the greatest issues confronting the human race. — Professor Nigel Cameron

Combines well-informed analysis with the empathy of a fellow Christian who never forgets how difficult the challenges of life can be. — Dr Megan Best

I can think of few better guides for someone intent on seeing clearly and acting virtuously in the life and death decisions of medical practice. — Professor David Albert Jones

Skilfully combining the insights of a scholar, the compassion of a practicing doctor and the nuanced convictions of a mature Christian… I cannot recommend this book enough, to medical professional and concerned onlooker alike. — Rev Mark Meynell

This thoroughly researched book comes at a crucial time in the fast-changing climate of contemporary medicine. John Wyatt presents a credible and challenging Christian response to the ethical minefields that face us in our future careers. — Caroline Ashby